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J. J. Keller and National Private Truck Council share the mission to help transportation professionals protect drivers and employees, and to operate safely. Our organizations offer co-sponsored educational webcasts for industry professionals regularly, on topics ranging from regulatory compliance to risk management and more.

NPTC members are invited to attend an upcoming webcast or download a previously-presented webcast from the 10-year webcast archive.

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Wednesday, May 29, 2024

11:00 AM Eastern

1 hour

DataQs: What Is It? How Does It Work? How Can You Increase Your Chances of Success?

The DataQs system is an electronic system for filing challenges, formally called “requests for reviews” or “RDRs,” to data maintained by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in the Motor Carrier Management Information System (MCMIS). This is the database has all roadside inspection reports, DOT-recordable crash reports, and the results of any investigations involving the carrier in it. During this webcast, our panel will discuss:

  • How the DataQs system works
  • How to file a challenge
  • The supporting documents or information you should include
  • Industry best practices

We’ll also hear from a private fleet who will share how they have had success with the DataQs system. Finally, you will also have a chance to get your questions answered throughout the live event!

2024 Webcast Schedule

FMCSA has stated that their intention is to continue running the Crash Preventability Determination Program, and eventually improve it. It is important that carriers understand how this program works and why it is critical that carriers use it. In this webcast we will review what FMCSA considers an accident, how carriers are to record them, how FMCSA records and uses crash data, and the process of challenging the DOT classification of the accident via the FMCSA’s DataQs website. We will then discuss why a carrier should participate in the preventability program, and when and how a carrier can request that a crash be considered “not-preventable.”

While the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program is not a regulation or set of regulations, it is the primary tool used to select carriers for intervention. For this reason, a carrier needs to have an understanding of how the system functions and therefore how to avoid an intervention. In this webcast, we will discuss what data is used to create the carrier’s scores, how a carrier’s scores are created, and what a carrier can do to improve them. We will also discuss the proposed changes to scoring tool within CSA, the Safety Measurement System or SMS.

The DataQs system is an electronic system for filing challenges, formally called “requests for reviews” or “RDRs,” to data maintained by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in the Motor Carrier Management Information System (MCMIS).  This is the database has all roadside inspection reports, DOT-recordable crash reports, and the results of any investigations involving the carrier in it. In this webcast we will discuss how the system works, how to file a challenge, and what supporting information or documents you should be including in your RDRs to be successful.

When discussing drug and alcohol testing, it is important to understand the technical aspects of the requirements as well as the sprit and overall goal of the regulations. In this webcast, we will discuss the required tests, how the decision is made after the lab reports the results to the medical review officer, including how marijuana and THC are handled by MROs, and the Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse and how it is connected to your drug testing program, hiring, and continued employment standards. Click here to register.

The advent of in-cab cameras has changed how companies view drivers, coach and modify behaviors and improve highway safety. But how do you know if your dash camera program is working? The answer likely lies in myriad factors and metrics – corporate culture, driving hiring, coaching prowess, data integrity and transparency. The challenge is there are no true external benchmarks because of the differences in systems and implementation. In this webcast, we will hear from industry leaders who have embraced dual-facing and are now reaping the benefits of improved safety and driver commitment.

A roadside inspection is a high-stress, and sometimes confusing and even mysterious experience for your driver. Having the driver knowledgeable and comfortable with the roadside inspection process can improve the outcome in a lot of cases. This webcast will provide carrier personnel with knowledge that can be shared with the drivers to help reduce the stress and the mysteries when it comes to roadside inspections and help improve the outcomes when it comes to them. In this webcast will discuss:

  • How drivers and vehicles are selected for inspection;
  • The regulatory issues that are being looked at during the inspection, including electronic logs;
  • The process and procedures involved in the inspection;
  • What will be asked of the driver;
  • Most importantly, how and why to share this information with your drivers; and
  • The latest development with roadside inspections, the Level VIII initiative.

Hoping you will pass a DOT audit should one come your way is not a sound strategy. You should continually be conducting your own tracking to see if you could be headed for an audit and conducting mock audits to see here you should be improving. In this webcast we will discuss:

  • The Federal Motor Carrier Administration (FMCSA) audit selection methodology,
  • The Six Factors of an audit,
  • The records audited in each of the Factors, and
  • How an audit is scored,

Armed with this information, a carrier can build their own self auditing mechanisms to increase the odds of a successful actual audit, should FMCSA come knocking.

To become and remain qualified to drive, a driver must pass a DOT physical. The process involves a driver being examined by a medical professional that is on the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners (NRCME). The examiner will use various sources, such as the Medical Examiner’s Handbook, the Medical Advisory Criteria, the Medical Review Board recommendations, and his or her judgement to determine if the driver is qualified based on the requirements in §391.41. In an era of growing driver shortages, fleet managers have a direct role in ensuring the driver passes the exam. Learn some of the best practices that fleets are using to enhance driver health and wellness and the steps that are being taken to ensure the driver remains medically qualified.

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